Image Distribution System: Data Gets to Where It's Needed

Cortex’s Image Distribution System ensures exams and reports are distributed in a timely and appropriate manner to the relevant institutions, systems, and clinicians involved in the patient’s care, and to the patient him or herself. The Image Distribution System comprises:

1. Cortex Sharing

Cortex’s digital sharing provides an easy way to reduce or eliminate the use of physical media (CDs, USBs) to transfer data. Medical imaging exams, reports and associated supporting documentation are sent directly to the intended audience. Shares are secure and can be sent to anyone with an email address. Any subsequent modifications to the shared content are automatically propagated to share recipients for as long as the share remains active.

Cortex digital sharing allows you to:

  • Improve the referral experience for your referral network
  • Share records seamlessly with specialists
  • Satisfy HIPAA obligations to provide patients with a copy of their records on demand
  • Convert a digital share to physical media, if needed

2. Interoperability and Automated Routing through Cortex’s Extensive Library of Connectors

Cortex offers true vendor neutrality, with the ability to easily connect using open standards to PACS systems, HIS/RIS systems, EHRs and other elements of the HIT ecosystem.

Integrates with:

  • GE
  • Philips
  • Agfa
  • Intelerad
  • McKesson
  • Meditech
  • Cerner
and others.

3. Advanced Connectivity Options

Cortex gives you the option to connect to other systems and enable advanced features such as:

  • Automated prefetching of relevant priors in advance of patient arrival - from an external PACS system within the enterprise or from an external enterprise altogether (given business-level agreement)
  • Localization of external priors to the local environment to respect local hanging protocols
  • Reduced time spent waiting for results from other departments, institutions, providers


Cortex Archive VNA as a Service: Image Distribution System